Paper Coffee Cups Are Recyclable in Peterborough

A City of Peterborough release below reminds the public that Peterborough does recycle coffee cups...

A recent article in the Toronto Star told Torontonians to stop recycling their paper coffee cups. City of Peterborough Waste Management officials want residents here to know they can still recycle coffee cups in Peterborough.
 
“Coffee cups can be put into your 'Container' blue box and they will definitely be recycled.” says Waste Diversion Section Manager Virginia Swinson.  “As always, we remind people to first remove plastic lids and stir sticks, as these are contaminants.”
 
While not all coffee cups are making it into the blue boxes, the City’s most recent curbside audit suggest between 60% - 70% do.  The material is hand sorted at the City’s recycling facility, and is marketed along with the cartons that milk, juice and other liquid products come in.
 
“We really want all your paper coffee cups Peterborough!”  Swinson emphasizes that every municipality has different recycling programs, different ways of sorting, different priorities, and sometimes, different markets. Peterborough is not the same as Toronto.
 

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Plant It Forward: A Class At Immaculate Conception Elementary School Created A Food Forest

Lead by the folks at GrowHappy.ca, Immaculate Conception elementary school in Peterborough created a "food forest" as part of an amazing class project on Thursday (June 23rd). Mitch Champagne's Grade 6/7 class collaborated with Mim Devitt's Grade 1 class to create a permaculture food forest.

Permaculture is a system of agricultural and social design principles centered around simulating or directly utilizing the patterns and features observed in natural ecosystems.

A Food Forest is a low maintenance sustainable plant-based food production and agroforestry system based on woodland ecosystems—incorporating fruit and nut trees, shrubs, herbs, vines and perennial vegetables which have yields directly useful to humans.

Teacher Mitch Champagne, who live tweeted much of the day (see some below), says their School Based Food Forest Permaculture project focused on teaching students about food systems, habitat, environmentally sustainable farming practices, cooking, preserving, seed gathering and propagation, pollination and more.

Champagne says there is a great deal of research that links gardening in youth with positive mental health—something GrowHappy.ca espouses as part of their "Plant It Forward" approach—and the class explored these links.

"It was an incredible opportunity to create a sustainable Food Forest with our students," Champagne tells PTBOCanada of this memorable day. "The children brought so much energy, curiosity, and wonder to the whole experience. They really understood the links to positive physical and mental health and were very eager to 'Plant It Forward.'"

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Lansdowne Place Has These Great Reminder Signs On All Their Doors

For several years, Lansdowne Place has been putting up these signs at all their entrances in summer to remind people not to leave their pets or kids in the car.

"We get a great deal of positive response from having these notices up," Emily Dart, Marketing Director of Lansdowne Place, tells PTBOCanada.

The signs are a vital reminder not to risk your pet or child's safety, even if you're "just running into the mall to quickly grab something." The mall showed great initiative to put these notices up, taking a pro-active approach to an important issue that still occurs way too often.

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15 Neat Facts About The Construction Of The Peterborough Lift Lock

1. The Peterborough Lift Lock on the Trent-Severn Waterway—aka Lock 21—was built between 1896 and 1904 in an era when the strength of people, horse and steam power was shaping the transportation systems of a growing nation.

Opening Day: July 9th, 1904

Opening Day: July 9th, 1904

2. The Lift Lock was part of a larger construction project to canalize the Otonabee River—allowing the Kawartha Lakes to connect with Peterborough's commercial centre.

3. To establish the foundations for the Lift Lock at Armour Hill during construction, 76,000 cubic yards of sand, soil and gravel were excavated until the limestone bedrock was reached 40 feet down.

4. The presswells for the hydraulic rams were excavated a further 75 feet into the rock.

5. A foundation of granite blocks—some weighing a whopping ten tons—was lowered to the bottom to provide a footing for the rams.

6. When completed, over 26,000 cubic yards of concrete had been poured, without a single piece of *reinforcing steel.

7. The Lift Lock was the first lock to be built out of concrete, and at the time was the largest structure ever built in the world with unreinforced concrete.

8. The installation of the steel chambers and hydraulic rams by Dominion Bridge Company of Montreal began in 1901 and was completed in 1904.

9. The original steelwork is still in use today, modified by zinc refinishing and welding on the boat chambers. (New aluminum gates were added during the mid-60s.)

10. Peterborough's Richard Birdsall Rogers (aka R.B. Rogers)—a civil and mechanical engineer from Peterborough who studied at McGill—oversaw the design and construction of the Lift Lock.

RB Rogers, pictured in the dark jacket near the centre, with his team of engineers.

RB Rogers, pictured in the dark jacket near the centre, with his team of engineers.

11. As originally built, the Lift Lock could generate all the necessary compressed air and water pumping pressure to operate the gate pivot engine, gate water seals and control systems by opening a water penstock set in the lock's upper reach.

12. The natural gravity fall of water powered the lock's internal machinery. This included a Taylor hydraulic air compressor, water turbines, water driven gate-engines and pumps.

13. The dual lifts are the highest hydraulic boat lifts in the world, with a lift of 19.8 m (65 ft).

14. The Lift Lock opened July 9th, 1904 to a huge crowd (see photo at top of post).

15. The Lift Lock, which was designated a National Historic Site in 1979, took eight years to construct.

*In the era of construction, the use of reinforcing steel was only just beginning, and the technique was viewed with professional skepticism.

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Photographer Captures These Beauty Pics Of Strawberry Moon On Summer Solstice Off Airport Road

Peterborough photographer Niki Allday captured great pictures of the full moon during last night's Summer Solstice. This was the first strawberry moon to fall on the same day as the summer solstice since 1967.

Photo by Niki Allday

Photo by Niki Allday

Allday tells PTBOCanada she captured the pics at 10 p.m. using a Nikon d7000.

"It was a once in a lifetime photograph, I was very excited to see the storms pass early so we could witness this," she tells PTBOCanada.

Photo by Niki Allday

Photo by Niki Allday

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PTBOCanada Interview: Axe Throwing Club Is Coming To Peterborough

Looking for a fun night out or great time building day with your work colleagues? Doors will open at the Peterborough Axe Club on August 2nd on Perry St., and you can sign up for league nights and private events now.

Watch our interview with the founders Carlo Raponi and Kalen Davidson below...

Peterborough Axe Club will be demonstrating axe-throwing at Peterborough Pulse community event on July 16th.

—post by Evan Holt

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2nd Annual Peterborough Yoga Festival Included Yoga Right On Little Lake

PTBOCanada Featured Post: Live & Local Lunches In Downtown Peterborough Are Awesome

PTBOCanada Featured Post: Live & Local Lunches In Downtown Peterborough Are Awesome

Sponsored post by DBIA

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We Just Experienced Under Water Dining At Lock 21 Dress Rehearsal & It Was Epic

We were among a select group of 12 people invited to a beta test of a unique experential tourism experiment on Thursday (June 16th): Under Water Dining @ Lock 21.

We started in a Voyageur canoe—dressed in Voyageur gear, of course!—and made our way up to the top of the Lift Lock with great tour guides from the Canoe Museum.

We then learned from the amazing Trent Severn team about the functionality and technology behind the Lift Lock, an engineering marvel that is the highest hydraulic lock in the world with a rise of 65 feet (19.8 metres).

Then we had a quick yummy food & drink break in front of the Locks...

After that, we had an amazing tour inside the bowels of the historic Lift Lock, which opened in 1904.

Manager of Canal Operations Chad Buchner

Manager of Canal Operations Chad Buchner

Then the highlight of many highlights: eating delectable food literally right under the Lock prepared by world class local chefs. The 6-course meal included Fennel & Buttermilk Flan, Trout, McLean's Asparagus and much more...

Like, seriously, we ate right under here...

We then retired to another room right next to the tunnel where cars go through—we could hear the honking right next to us through the wall—to have dessert and hear ghost stories from Ed The Lockmaster...

Ed The Entertainer Lockmaster telling ghost stories

Ed The Entertainer Lockmaster telling ghost stories

Thanks to Peterborough & The Kawarthas Tourism, the Trent Severn Waterway crew and the Canadian Canoe Museum for putting on this awesome dress rehearsal event that we hope to see marketed to the public sometime soon. It will be a hit locally and to tourists across Canada and beyond.

—post by Neil Morton

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