B!KE: The Peterborough Community Cycling Hub Facing Financial Hardship, Hosting Fundraiser July 13th

B!KE: The Peterborough Community Cycling Hub (293 George Street North) needs your help to stay a float, which is why they are hosting their first ever B!KE-a-thon on July 13th to raise the funds they need to keep their doors open and their programs running.

B!KE—an incorporated not-for-profit cycling education and support organization that’s been working with the Peterborough community since 2006 teaching bike maintenance, repair and riding skills—is facing financial hardship due to recently passed provincial legislation that caused it to lose significant core funding.


They need your support to ensure B!KE continues to run effectively for the community. By FUNdraising for B!KE, your team will help the cycling hub continue to deliver high quality, low-barrier cycling education programs, and a community bike workshop and hub.

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REGISTER YOUR TEAM

For one full day, enthusiastic B!KE supporters will gather together to “spin the pedals “ for B!KE. Signing up as a team, cyclists will a ride stationary bike (one per team) for 12 hours straight to raise funds for B!KE. Team names, costumes and themed teams are strongly encouraged. Stationary bikes can be provided, but you may bring your own.

If you love to ride and believe in what B!KE does, they need you to gather your friends, family and work colleagues, and lead a team! Each team will be comprised of five members, and collectively it’s their job to keep a bicycle in motion for the entire event. Each team must commit to raising $500 (or more) in support of B!KE.

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The fundraiser takes place Saturday, July 13th, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Set-up time starts at 7:30 am.) Join B!KE on the back patio of The Social, 295 George Street North. (If it rains, they’ll move inside.) A lunch, snacks and non-alcoholic drinks will be provided free of charge.

Organizations interested in sponsoring the event can contact David Koski by email, and general inquiries for the event and about the hub can be directed to B!KE executive director Tegan Moss via email or by calling 705.775.7227.

Go to communitybikeshop.org for more info on the organization, and register here for this fundraiser.

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Pilots Spot Drones In Close Proximity To Aircraft At Peterborough Airport

Twice last week at the Peterborough Airport, drones were spotted by pilots in close proximity to aircraft while they were flying around the airport, according to Peterborough Police.

“This is a concern for the safety of the aircraft and the safety of the pilots,” says Lisa Davidson, Peterborough Airport Manager. “If a drone is struck in flight, resulting in a mid-air collision, it could cause the pilot to lose control of the aircraft, or seriously damage the plane causing an emergency situation.”

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“The safety at the airport is jeopardized every time a person operates a drone, disregarding the rules that allow both planes and drones to operate safely,” adds Davidson. “Drones are not allowed to be operated within 5.6 km of an airport.”

The drone was spotted at approximately 1000′ above the ground both times it was spotted and was operating dangerously close to aircraft flying in the circuit.

“In one instance the drone was noted to be black and orange in colour with flashing lights, which shows how close the drone was to the pilot in that case,” says Davidson. In both instances, Peterborough Police were called and responded to the airport to assist with trying to find the location of the drone operator.

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“Flying drones in close proximity to an airport and other aircraft is extremely dangerous, irresponsible and illegal,” says Inspector John Lyons, Operations Division, Peterborough Police Service.

“We encourage anyone with information regarding persons engaged in this behaviour to contact police or Crime Stoppers,” adds Lyons.

Transport Canada states that drones are aircraft—which makes the person operating the drone a pilot. When flying the drone, you’re sharing the skies with other drones and aircraft. Before flying, the public needs to understand the rules. For more information on drone safety, click here.

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Reno Begins At Peterborough Memorial Centre, What You Need To Know

Construction is starting on the Peterborough Memorial Centre arena pad renovation project at 151 Lansdowne St. W. on Saturday, June 1st and is expected to be completed by late October.

Portions of the parking lot will be closed with restricted access and there will be heavy equipment operating in the area with associated noise that it may cause. The Lock Street entrance to the south parking lot will be closed for the duration of the project.

The contractor will be working 12-hour shifts of 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. throughout the project, with the potential for some elevated noise during for the first two to four weeks of the project. The expectation is that Sunday work would not be required after the first four weeks.

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SERVICES THAT WILL (AND WON’T) BE IMPACTED

-> Peterborough Memorial Centre arena pad activities have been relocated to other community arena facilities.

-> The Baker Tilly Box Office at the PMC will continue to be open for ticket sales Monday to Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

-> The Peterborough Farmers’ Market continues in the parking lot on Saturdays from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Parking can be accessed from entrances on Roger Neilson Way.

-> Peterborough and District Sports Hall of Fame will maintain its standard operating hours with the Hall of Fame open Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to noon. Access will be from the north side of the facility.

-> The Peterborough Petes OHL team intends to have its offices at the PMC open during regular business hours, but due to the construction project the Petes encourage patrons to contact the office before visiting the facility as temporary closures may occur.

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My Father Is My Monarch Butterfly: "Dougie's Story", As Told By His Daughter To PTBOCanada

Doug Johnson—aka "Dougie"—has been a staple in downtown Peterborough for many years. He is a kind and generous homeless man who has endeared himself to so many with his smile, kindness and gentle nature.

Up until recently, not many people knew his story—as they don’t with most homeless people, all who have their own unique backstory. They only knew fragments of what had been cobbled together from those that know him.

Photo of Doug via Dana’s Facebook post

Photo of Doug via Dana’s Facebook post

But that all changed on May 1st, when his daughter, Dana—most people weren’t aware Dougie had kids—did a heartfelt and brave Facebook post (see below) after how his mental illness has, in many respects, robbed her of her father—an “incredibly unique human being,” she says.

”Schizophrenia and addiction took our true connection,” she writes in the Facebook post. “This is something I struggled understanding as a little girl, and even now as an adult. As much as I recognize this is the journey his spirit was meant to take, it has always been hard for me to admit to just anyone… It’s hard to love someone with an illness, it’s exhausting emotionally. When I’m near him I melt, I’m happy, I’m sad, I’m protective, I’m reactive, because there is so many emotions I’m making my way through it’s like my heart and head are in overdrive.”

Dana with her Dad Doug (photo for PTBOCanada courtesy Dana)

Dana with her Dad Doug (photo for PTBOCanada courtesy Dana)

You can read her entire Facebook post embedded below which received hundreds of shares on Facebook (after all, everyone knows Dougie and have been touched by him in some way) and then her story for PTBOCanada which traces more of her journey with her Dad, and the tremendous impact her social media post has had on so many.

MY FATHER DOUG: IN DANA’S OWN WORDS FOR PTBOCANADA READERS…

My recent post about my dad Doug Johnson got a lot of feedback on Facebook, and since then I’ve been asked to elaborate on who I am by PTBOCanada, and why this was something I decided to bite my lip, hold my breath and post.

Trust me, it was not easy.

I am Dana Johnson, born in Peterborough on June 25th, 1986. I currently live in Calgary, Alberta where I drive a truck for the City of Calgary and where I’m also an artist with Maskcara.

From the time I was 11, I sang across Ontario and a few times in Nashville. Jobs were sparse for me and most day-jobs don’t love when you take weekends off for music endeavours.

I chose to move to Alberta to make a life for myself here. A lot of my mother’s side of the family had moved west, and moving to Alberta brought me closer to my brother in Victoria. My brother is an EOD in the Canadian Navy and travels the world, doing very top secret Navy stuff! (Which is the coolest thing ever.)

Doug in happier times with his children (Dana at right)

Doug in happier times with his children (Dana at right)

I met my husband when I moved to Calgary, and he has two beautiful children. We got married in October of 2017, in Fish Creek Park. It was a small ceremony, in the woods with our mothers, the children and two friends. My brother was in between Victoria and Ontario and made a quick weekend stopover. It was always my dream to have him walk me “down the aisle” as he is one of my heroes in life.

When my dad, Doug, was 28, he fell ill with a cold from what I understand—and that together with working hard, enjoying his evenings at parties and recently having his first born caused something to snap in him. Still, he would lend a hand to anyone who asked.

The loss of his grandfather was likely the final straw, and something happened in his mind. Nobody really knew what it was; it was just speculated that he had a mental breakdown. However after he was monitored for a while, the doctors deemed the mental breakdown as a meltdown which was a result of no rest. Some would call it burning the candle at both ends. Somehow schizophrenia had paired with it, which explained why he was acting euphoric.

Doug in his younger years (photo courtesy of Dana for PTBOCanada)

Doug in his younger years (photo courtesy of Dana for PTBOCanada)

After that incident, he got better with the help of amazing doctors. They found a medication that worked for him. He was doing really well and that’s when my parents decided to have another baby. That baby was me.

However with schizophrenia, you have to take your medication. That didn’t always happen. My dad continued to work hard, play hard and things went down hill for a while.

My mom decided she needed to take care of herself and their children. Her father was worried for her safety, and had offered his support to leave after my dad was found in my mom’s parents house, trying to light a fire in the corner of the kitchen. My mom’s family loved my dad, he was respectful, kind and caring. He was exactly who he is today, without his mental illness.

Dana with her Dad Doug (photo for PTBOCanada courtesy Dana)

Dana with her Dad Doug (photo for PTBOCanada courtesy Dana)

Since then, I have watched my father go from having a beautiful family, and then through another divorce, to living on the streets. 

It’s never been easy, but every time I had the chance to spend time with him, I wholeheartedly opened up and loved on him—from Christmas dinners, weddings, funerals and running into him on the streets.

My father is my Monarch Butterfly. Why? Because growing up, spending time at his home, he always had them, dehydrated in coasters or sitting in his china cabinet. So anytime I see a butterfly, he is on my mind.

Photo via Dana’s Facebook post

Photo via Dana’s Facebook post

On my 21st birthday, I was at the beach in Cobourg near Peterborough where I lived at the time, and a flock of Monarchs swarmed me and then flew off. In my heart, I knew that was my dad wishing me a happy birthday.

That same day I went to Peterborough for a birthday dinner, and as I was jumping out of my boyfriend’s Jeep running into different restaurants to see if they had any birthday specials, I saw him.

It was the first time I ever saw my dad on the street. As I walked towards him, with open arms, I said, “Hi dad”. We hugged and awkwardly made our way through a conversation to which I explained it was my birthday. 

Looking down at his plastic container, with the contents of change and cigarettes, he raised his hand and offered me a Pixy Stix and said, “Here, have this. Happy birthday.” I declined, which was difficult. Instead I hugged him again and waved goodbye. As I got into my boyfriend’s Jeep, I was overcome by emotion and broke down into tears. I still to this day regret not inviting him to eat with me.

Since the authenticity post I made on Facebook, I’ve had so many people reach out. The one thing they all have in common is how much he is loved by his friends and the community in Peterborough. 

People have opened up to me and shared their personal journey as a daughter or son, mother or father expressing the feelings associated with learning how to deal emotionally with mental illness.

Photo via Dana’s Facebook post

Photo via Dana’s Facebook post

What I’ve learned from being vulnerable is we are not alone, we are all different, and we all desire to be accepted and accept ourselves fully in this journey we call life.

No one is perfect. We will fail, but how will we get up and dust ourselves off to make amends?

Taking care of our needs and mental stability is so important. I’ve learnt that it’s okay to not feel ashamed to ask for help, not to hide, or stuff all the feelings way down deep. Because when it blows up, it could be life changing.

At 32, I can honestly say, growing up, I was afraid to “catch” this mental illness, not ever truly knowing why my dad did.

Today I recognize how important it is to step back, take a deep breath and lay down my cards. Because we aren’t playing life, life plays for us, it’s how we overcome our obstacles. 

I am honoured to hear all the love Peterborough has for my father, the way I have that same love for him—not in spite of his illness but because he brought me into the world and he is a part of who I am.

This situation is very unique, as some people are faced with this illness at a very young age. My father had the good fortune to have a healthy adolescence. He was a social director for his high school, where he would scout bands to play at dances.

After high school was over, he had many jobs: He worked at a slaughterhouse; as a contractor building fences in new subdivisions; and at the GM truck plant. He worked for his dad his whole life helping at his farm, and he got married and started a family before he was diagnosed.

I appreciate the love and support everyone has been so kind to give to me. This is something I have worked through my entire life, and I don’t feel the need to hide it anymore. It will help more people if I’m honest and transparent then keeping it tucked away.

If you have questions or concerns about a loved one, or about yourself, please send me a DM on Facebook. I’m here for you, as you have been here for me.

—guest post by Dana Johnson

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29th Annual Gilmour Street Garage Sale Is This Weekend

It's the 29th Annual Gilmour Street Garage Sale this year—one of the can't miss community events in the city.

As per tradition, the Gilmour Street Garage Sale falls on the Saturday after the long weekend. This year, it's Saturday, May 25th starting at 9 a.m.—although people have been known to show up as early as 7 a.m. in the hunt for a good bargain! The event runs until about 1 p.m.

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The biggest street sale in all of Peterborough, it extends out to many other streets in the neighbourhood, and there are also many sales for charitable organizations in town.

For more info, click
here.

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Canoe Museum's Campfires & Cocktails Flannel Event Raises Over $40,000 To Support Educational Programming

More than 200 people attended the Canadian Canoe Museum’s first-ever “Campfires and Cocktails” event on May 4th, enjoying local food and drink, live music and an amazing auction.

The event raised $40,250 to support educational programming and will return next year, offering community members another opportunity to “channel their flannel”.

Photo by Bryan Reid for Canadian Canoe Museum

Photo by Bryan Reid for Canadian Canoe Museum

The museum’s galleries were brimming thanks to the support of many, including the volunteer organizing committee, sponsors, food providers, and the 15 local artists and distinguished Canadians who painted paddles for the live auction.

The evening was set to music by local country-folk-pop trio the Dixie Hicks and complemented by artisans at work in the Preserving Skills Gallery.

Dixie Hicks, photo by Bryan Reid for Canadian Canoe Museum

Dixie Hicks, photo by Bryan Reid for Canadian Canoe Museum

“This first-of-its-kind event was embraced by the community, and we are so grateful for all the support the museum received,” says Caroline Anderson, Annual Giving Co-ordinator with the museum.

Photo by Bryan Reid for Canadian Canoe Museum

Photo by Bryan Reid for Canadian Canoe Museum

“From the organizing committee led by Jane Ulrich, to the local businesses who brought such incredible creativity to the table, we were amazed by the initiative and interest,” adds Anderson.

To learn more about the Canoe Museum, paddle over here.

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Zoo's Miniature Train Ride Opening Late This Year

The Riverview Park and Zoo’s popular miniature train ride traditionally opens around the Victoria Day long weekend but not this season unfortunately.

The zoo has announced that the opening has been delayed due to the project for the rehabilitation of the pump house building at the dam being delayed by the poor weather this spring.

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“We are not able to operate the train until the project is completed,” the zoo says. “At this time, we’re estimating that we’ll be opening in the second week of June.”

For updates, follow the zoo on Twitter and Facebook.

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PTBOCanada Featured Post: Habitat For Humanity Peterborough Opens New ReStore In North End

PTBOCanada Featured Post: Habitat For Humanity Peterborough Opens New ReStore In North End

Sponsored post by Habitat for Humanity Peterborough

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14 Unique Paddles & A Walter Walker Cedar-Strip Canoe Will Be Up For Auction At Campfires & Cocktails Event

Paddles that have been painted, carved and adorned by distinguished Canadians and local artists, along with a classic cedar-strip canoe built by the renowned Walter Walker, will be part of a live auction at The Canadian Canoe Museum’s Campfires & Cocktails event on May 4th.

Dr. Roberta Bondar, Peter Mansbridge and Cynthia Dale, Peer Christensen, and John Climenhage, are among those who have created paddles in support of this casual, camp-inspired event. These paddles, along with the 16-foot classic canoe, will be auctioned by special guest Susan Dunkley.

From top to bottom: works by Robert Atyeo, Dr. Roberta Bondar, Tia Cavanagh, Randall Knott, Robyn Jenkins.

From top to bottom: works by Robert Atyeo, Dr. Roberta Bondar, Tia Cavanagh, Randall Knott, Robyn Jenkins.

Campfires & Cocktails will see guests explore the museum’s galleries as they enjoy campfire-inspired cuisine prepared by local culinary experts, and cocktails. The Dixie Hicks, a local country-folk-pop trio featuring Kate Brioux, Melissa Payne and Kate Suhr, will also be performing.

Walter Walker cedar-strip canoe (Photo courtesy Canoe Musuem)

Walter Walker cedar-strip canoe (Photo courtesy Canoe Musuem)

“Each of the individuals who created a paddle did so with great care and consideration and they’re exquisite works of art,” says Caroline Anderson, Annual Giving Co-ordinator. “Dr. Bondar’s paddle features one of her photographs, while Peter Mansbridge and Cynthia Dale painted a striking sunset sky,”

“Meanwhile, Tia Cavanagh, a multi-disciplinary Indigenous artist, painted the full paddle with a white design on a black background to represent stars in the night sky. We saw so much creativity from those we approached and some, like David Hickey and Randall Knott, even decided to do carvings on their paddles. The museum is so grateful for these incredible contributions.”

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Paddles were generously created and donated by: Robert Atyeo, Dr. Roberta Bondar, Tia Cavanagh, John Climenhage, Peer Christensen, Beth Fisher, Jeannie Guillet, David Hickey, Robyn Jenkins, Jenny Kastner, Randall Knott, Peter Mansbridge and Cynthia Dale, Renee O’Connor and Joe Stable.

The classic canoe, donated to the museum by supporter and volunteer Nan Campbell, will be featured in the live auction, but bids by proxy will also be accepted. Walter Walker worked for the Peterborough Canoe Company for two decades and is remembered as a master in balancing quality and efficiency in his trade.

Guests are encouraged to channel their flannel as part of this casual camp-inspired event. Funds raised will support educational and public programs offered at the museum.

Tickets are $75 per person and are available now on a first-come, first serve basis for this new opportunity to experience the museum’s world-class collection.

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With More Rain On Way Higher Water Levels Are Anticipated Along Otonabee River

A flood warning remains in effect for the City of Peterborough, according to a City of Peterborough release. Water levels will continue to rise along the Kawartha Lakes and Otonabee River over the next several days.

Environment Canada is forecasting heavy rainfall Thursday night into Friday. Total rainfall amounts of 25 to 40 millimetres are expected by Friday night, and may exceed 50 millimetres in some areas.

The City is closely monitoring the situation in consultation with Trent-Severn Waterway, Otonabee Conservation and local dam operators, and is prepared to respond as required.

File photo by Evan Holt

File photo by Evan Holt

HOW TO PREPARE YOURSELF IN LOW-LYING AREAS

• The City encourages residents in low-lying areas along the Otonabee River to monitor water level changes on their properties and to take necessary precautions for their safety and their property.

• Docks and structures close to the water should be secured or moved, and other personal items such as lawn furniture should be moved to higher ground.

• Residents should have sufficient and appropriate emergency supplies at the ready. Sump pumps and backflow preventers should be checked to ensure that they are functioning properly.   

• Residents who have properties that are susceptible to flooding should consider getting supplies such as pumps, generators and sandbags from local rental companies, hardware stores and landscape suppliers.

SANDBAG AVAILABILITY

City residents in imminent danger of flooding on their property can get sandbags from the City of Peterborough, which will have limited supplies available at several locations in preparation for potential flooding in low-lying areas along the Otonabee River.

The provision of sandbags by the City is intended for lower entry points on foundations, such as doorways and window wells. Residents will be required to personally fill, transport, place and remove the sandbags.  Residents wishing to place sandbags along the riverbank should access supplies from hardware stores or landscape suppliers.

Sandbag supplies are available from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday at the following locations:

• Riverside Drive at Cameron Street
• Riverside Drive at Spruce Avenue
• Sherin Avenue at Collison Park

Sandbag supplies will also be available on Friday, April 26th, between 7 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. at the same locations.

To report a flood in your area, call the Otonabee Conservation Flood Watch Hotline at 705-745-5791 ext. 228, which is available on a 24-hour basis. Anyone who feels that they are in immediate danger by rising water should call 9-1-1.

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